BINA

3597 articles

75 publishers

Join mailing list

Jun 2022 • Journal of Cell Science

Glucocorticoids enhance chemotherapy-driven stress granule assembly and impair granule dynamics, leading to cell death

Avital Schwed-Gross, Hila Hamiel, Gabriel P Faber, Mor Angel, Rakefet Ben-Yishay, Jennifer IC Benichou, Dana Ishay-Ronen, Yaron Shav-Tal

Stress granules (SGs) can assemble in cancer cells upon chemotoxic stress. Glucocorticoids function during stress responses and are administered with chemotherapies. The roles of glucocorticoids in SG assembly and disassembly pathways are unknown. We examined whether combining glucocorticoids such as cortisone with chemotherapies from the vinca-alkaloid family that dismantle the microtubule network, will affect SG assembly and disassembly pathways and influence cell viability in cancer cells and in human-derived organoids. Cortisone augmented SG formation when combined with Vinorelbine (VRB). Live-cell imaging showed that cortisone increased SG assembly rates but reduced SG clearance rates after stress, by increasing protein residence times within the SGs. Mechanistically, VRB and cortisone signaled through the eIF2α-mediated integrated stress response yet induced different kinases …

Show more

Jun 2022 • Laser and Particle Beams

Particles Detection System with CR-39 Based on Deep Learning

Gal Amit, Idan Mosseri, Ofir Even-Hen, Nadav Schneider, Elad Fisher, Hanan Datz, Eliahu Cohen, Noaz Nissim

We present a novel method that we call FAINE, fast artificial intelligence neutron detection system. FAINE automatically classifies tracks of fast neutrons on CR-39 detectors using a deep learning model. This method was demonstrated using a LANDAUER Neutrak® fast neutron dosimetry system, which is installed in the External Dosimetry Laboratory (EDL) at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). In modern fast neutron dosimetry systems, after the preliminary stages of etching and imaging of the CR-39 detectors, the third stage uses various types of computer vision systems combined with a manual revision to count the CR-39 tracks and then convert them to a dose in mSv units. Our method enhances these modern systems by introducing an innovative algorithm, which uses deep learning to classify all CR-39 tracks as either real neutron tracks or any other sign such as dirt, scratches, or even cleaning remainders. This new algorithm makes the third stage of manual CR-39 tracks revision superfluous and provides a completely repeatable and accurate way of measuring either neutrons flux or dose. The experimental results show a total accuracy rate of 96.7% for the true positive tracks and true negative tracks detected by our new algorithm against the current method, which uses computer vision followed by manual revision. This algorithm is now in the process of calibration for both alpha-particles detection and fast neutron spectrometry classification and is expected to be very useful in analyzing results of proton-boron11 fusion experiments. Being fully automatic, the new algorithm will enhance the quality assurance and effectiveness of …

Show more

Jun 2022 • Science Advances

A long noncoding RNA promotes parasite differentiation in African trypanosomes

Fabien Guegan, K Shanmugha Rajan, Fábio Bento, Daniel Pinto-Neves, Mariana Sequeira, Natalia Gumińska, Seweryn Mroczek, Andrzej Dziembowski, Smadar Cohen-Chalamish, Tirza Doniger, Beathrice Galili, Antonio M Estévez, Cedric Notredame, Shulamit Michaeli, Luisa M Figueiredo

The parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes African sleeping sickness that is fatal to patients if untreated. Parasite differentiation from a replicative slender form into a quiescent stumpy form promotes host survival and parasite transmission. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are known to regulate cell differentiation in other eukaryotes. To determine whether lncRNAs are also involved in parasite differentiation, we used RNA sequencing to survey the T. brucei genome, identifying 1428 previously uncharacterized lncRNA genes. We find that grumpy lncRNA is a key regulator that promotes parasite differentiation into the quiescent stumpy form. This function is promoted by a small nucleolar RNA encoded within the grumpy lncRNA. snoGRUMPY binds to messenger RNAs of at least two stumpy regulatory genes, promoting their expression. grumpy overexpression reduces parasitemia in infected mice. Our analyses …

Show more

Jun 2022 • Chemical Bulletin of Kazakh National University

Применение сорбентов на основе природного цеолита и шамотной глины для извлечения ионов натрия и калия из соленой воды: предварительное исследование

Gulziya A Seilkhanova, Akmaral B Rakhym, Anastasiya V Kan, Aruzhan K Kenessova, Yitzhak Mastai

treated with NaCl and HNO3 solutions were obtained to extract Na+ and K+ ions from saline water. The physicochemical characteristics of the obtained sorbents were studied by SEM, EDAX, and BET methods. It was found that successive treatment with NaCl and HNO3 solutions has a positive effect on the sorption properties of the studied materials. The maximum increase in the specific surface area from 4.5 m2/g to 39.3 m2/g is observed for acid-treated Z, and the specific surface area of ​​ChC also increases almost 2-fold from 8.4 m2/g to 15.3 m2/g. Na+ and K+ ions are extracted from water due to ion exchange with Z and ChC cations. As a result of determining the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the studied sorbents, it was found that treatment with a NaCl solution improves the ion exchange properties of the sorbent and leads to the formation of a “homoionic” form of aluminosilicates. Due to that the sorbents more easily enter ion exchange reactions. The authors established the sorption activity of the obtained materials based on natural Z and ChC with respect to Na+ and K+ cations. The maximum recovery rate is 28.45% for Na+ ions with the ChC-Na-H sorbent and 76.28% for K+ ions with the ChC-Na sorbent. Among Z-based sorbents, the most effective forms are Z-Na-H (15.44% Na+ recovery) and Z-Na (60.47% K+ recovery).

Show more

Jun 2022 • Laser and Particle Beams

Particles Detection System with CR-39 Based on Deep Learning

Gal Amit, Idan Mosseri, Ofir Even-Hen, Nadav Schneider, Elad Fisher, Hanan Datz, Eliahu Cohen, Noaz Nissim

We present a novel method that we call FAINE, fast artificial intelligence neutron detection system. FAINE automatically classifies tracks of fast neutrons on CR-39 detectors using a deep learning model. This method was demonstrated using a LANDAUER Neutrak® fast neutron dosimetry system, which is installed in the External Dosimetry Laboratory (EDL) at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). In modern fast neutron dosimetry systems, after the preliminary stages of etching and imaging of the CR-39 detectors, the third stage uses various types of computer vision systems combined with a manual revision to count the CR-39 tracks and then convert them to a dose in mSv units. Our method enhances these modern systems by introducing an innovative algorithm, which uses deep learning to classify all CR-39 tracks as either real neutron tracks or any other sign such as dirt, scratches, or even cleaning remainders. This new algorithm makes the third stage of manual CR-39 tracks revision superfluous and provides a completely repeatable and accurate way of measuring either neutrons flux or dose. The experimental results show a total accuracy rate of 96.7% for the true positive tracks and true negative tracks detected by our new algorithm against the current method, which uses computer vision followed by manual revision. This algorithm is now in the process of calibration for both alpha-particles detection and fast neutron spectrometry classification and is expected to be very useful in analyzing results of proton-boron11 fusion experiments. Being fully automatic, the new algorithm will enhance the quality assurance and effectiveness of external dosimetry, will lower the uncertainty for the reported dose measurements, and might also enable lowering the system’s detection threshold.

Show more

Jun 2022 • Journal of Biological Chemistry

Identification and functional implications of pseudouridine RNA modification on small noncoding RNAs in the mammalian pathogen Trypanosoma brucei

K Shanmugha Rajan, Katerina Adler, Tirza Doniger, Smadar Cohen-Chalamish, Noa Aharon-Hefetz, Saurav Aryal, Yitzhak Pilpel, Christian Tschudi, Ron Unger, Shulamit Michaeli

Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite that causes sleeping sickness, cycles between an insect and a mammalian host. However, the effect of RNA modifications such as pseudouridinylation on its ability to survive in these two different host environments is unclear. Here, two genome-wide approaches were applied for mapping pseudouridinylation sites (Ψs) on small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA), 7SL RNA, vtRNA, and tRNAs from T. brucei. We show using HydraPsiSeq and RiboMeth-seq, that the Ψ on C/D snoRNA guiding 2’-O-methylation increased the efficiency of the guided modification on its target, rRNA. We found differential levels of Ψs on these ncRNAs in the two life stages (insect host and mammalian host) of the parasite. Furthermore, tRNA isoform abundance and Ψ modifications were characterized in these two life stages demonstrating stage-specific regulation. We conclude that the differential Ψ modifications …

Show more

Jun 2022 • Journal of the American Chemical Society

Inherent Minor Conformer of Bordetella Effector BteA Directs Chaperone-Mediated Unfolding

Adi Yahalom, Hadassa Shaked, Sharon Ruthstein, Jordan H Chill

The pathogen Bordetella pertussis uses a type-3 secretion system (T3SS) to inject its cytotoxic effector BteA into the host cell via a designated needle structure. Prior to injection BteA is bound to its cognate chaperone BtcA presumed to assist in effector unfolding en route to needle passage. We utilized NMR and EPR spectroscopy to uncover the molecular mechanism of BtcA-mediated unfolding of BteA. BtcA induces a global structural change in the effector, which adopts a more extended and partially unfolded conformation. EPR distance measurements further show that the structured helical-bundle form of free BteA exists in conformational equilibrium with a lowly populated minor species. The nature of this equilibrium was probed using NMR relaxation dispersion experiments. At 283 K structural effects are most pronounced for a contiguous surface spanning the A- and B-helices of BteA, extending at 303 K to a …

Show more

Jun 2022 • ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces

On the Practical Applications of the Magnesium Fluorinated Alkoxyaluminate Electrolyte in Mg Battery Cells

Tjaša Pavčnik, Matic Lozinšek, Klemen Pirnat, Alen Vizintin, Toshihiko Mandai, Doron Aurbach, Robert Dominko, Jan Bitenc

High-performance electrolytes are at the heart of magnesium battery development. Long-term stability along with the low potential difference between plating and stripping processes are needed to consider them for next-generation battery devices. Within this work, we perform an in-depth characterization of the novel Mg[Al(hfip)4]2 salt in different glyme-based electrolytes. Specific importance is given to the influence of water content and the role of additives in the electrolyte. Mg[Al(hfip)4]2-based electrolytes exemplify high tolerance to water presence and the beneficial effect of additives under aggravated cycling conditions. Finally, electrolyte compatibility is tested with three different types of Mg cathodes, spanning different types of electrochemical mechanisms (Chevrel phase, organic cathode, sulfur). Benchmarking with an electrolyte containing a state-of-the-art Mg[B(hfip)4]2 salt exemplifies an improved …

Show more

Jun 2022 • JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM 42 (1_ SUPPL), 263-264, 2022

Advanced theranostic nanocarrier-mediated delivery of NGF in a combination therapy trigger enhanced recovery after stroke

M Wacker, F Wetterling, T Feczko, K Arkelius, A Arnou, J Lellouche, S Ansar


Jun 2022 • The Journal of Immunology

Ontogeny of the B Cell Receptor Repertoire and Microbiome in Mice

Amit Gilboa, Ronen Hope, Shira Ben Simon, Pazit Polak, Omry Koren, Gur Yaari

The immune system matures throughout childhood to achieve full functionality in protecting our bodies against threats. The immune system has a strong reciprocal symbiosis with the host bacterial population and the two systems co-develop, shaping each other. Despite their fundamental role in health physiology, the ontogeny of these systems is poorly characterized. In this study, we investigated the development of the BCR repertoire by analyzing high-throughput sequencing of their receptors in several time points of young C57BL/6J mice. In parallel, we explored the development of the gut microbiome. We discovered that the gut IgA repertoires change from birth to adolescence, including an increase in CDR3 lengths and somatic hypermutation levels. This contrasts with the spleen IgM repertoires that remain stable and distinct from the IgA repertoires in the gut. We also discovered that large clones that germinate …

Show more

Jun 2022 • ACS omega

Design and use of a gold nanoparticle–carbon dot hybrid for a FLIM-based implication nano logic gate

Shweta Pawar, Hamootal Duadi, Yafit Fleger, Dror Fixler

The interest in nanomaterials resides in the fact that they can be used to create smaller, faster, and more portable systems. Nanotechnology is already transforming health care. Nanoparticles are being used by scientists to target malignancies, improve drug delivery systems, and improve medical imaging. Integration of biomolecular logic gates with nanostructures has opened new paths in illness detection and therapy that need precise control of complicated components. Most studies have used fluorescence intensity techniques to implement the logic function. Its drawbacks, mainly when working with nanoparticles in intracellular media, include fluctuations in excitation power, fluorophore concentration dependence, and interference from cell autofluorescence. We suggest using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in order to circumvent these constraints. Designing a nanohybrid composed of gold …

Show more

Jun 2022 • Nature Communications

A forward Brillouin fibre laser

Gil Bashan, H Hagai Diamandi, Elad Zehavi, Kavita Sharma, Yosef London, Avi Zadok

Fibre lasers based on backward stimulated Brillouin scattering provide narrow linewidths and serve in signal processing and sensing applications. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in fibres takes place in the forward direction as well, with amplification bandwidths that are narrower by two orders of magnitude. However, forward Brillouin lasers have yet to be realized in any fibre platform. In this work, we report a first forward Brillouin fibre laser, using a bare off-the-shelf, panda-type polarisation maintaining fibre. Pump light in one principal axis provides Brillouin amplification for a co-propagating lasing signal of the orthogonal polarisation. Feedback is provided by Bragg gratings at both ends of the fibre cavity. Single-mode, few-modes and multi-mode regimes of operation are observed. The lasing threshold exhibits a unique environmental sensitivity: it is elevated when the fibre is partially immersed in water due to the …

Show more

Jun 2022 • Sensors 22 (12), 4497, 2022

Recent Advances in Rapid and Highly Sensitive Detection of Proteins and Specific DNA Sequences Using a Magnetic Modulation Biosensing System

Shira Roth, Michael Margulis, Amos Danielli

In early disease stages, biomolecules of interest exist in very low concentrations, presenting a significant challenge for analytical devices and methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of an innovative optical biosensing technology, termed magnetic modulation biosensing (MMB), its biomedical applications, and its ongoing development. In MMB, magnetic beads are attached to fluorescently labeled target molecules. A controlled magnetic force aggregates the magnetic beads and transports them in and out of an excitation laser beam, generating a periodic fluorescent signal that is detected and demodulated. MMB applications include rapid and highly sensitive detection of specific nucleic acid sequences, antibodies, proteins, and protein interactions. Compared with other established analytical methodologies, MMB provides improved sensitivity, shorter processing time, and simpler protocols.

Show more

May 2022 • Communications Biology

Statistical parametrization of cell cytoskeleton reveals lung cancer cytoskeletal phenotype with partial EMT signature

Arkaprabha Basu, Manash K Paul, Mitchel Alioscha-Perez, Anna Grosberg, Hichem Sahli, Steven M Dubinett, Shimon Weiss

Epithelial–mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a multi-step process that involves cytoskeletal rearrangement. Here, developing and using an image quantification tool, Statistical Parametrization of Cell Cytoskeleton (SPOCC), we have identified an intermediate EMT state with a specific cytoskeletal signature. We have been able to partition EMT into two steps:(1) initial formation of transverse arcs and dorsal stress fibers and (2) their subsequent conversion to ventral stress fibers with a concurrent alignment of fibers. Using the Orientational Order Parameter (OOP) as a figure of merit, we have been able to track EMT progression in live cells as well as characterize and quantify their cytoskeletal response to drugs. SPOCC has improved throughput and is non-destructive, making it a viable candidate for studying a broad range of biological processes. Further, owing to the increased stiffness (and by inference invasiveness …

Show more

May 2022 • Acta Biomaterialia

Molecular differences in collagen organization and in organic-inorganic interfacial structure of bones with and without osteocytes

Raju Nanda, Shani Hazan, Katrein Sauer, Victoria Aladin, Keren Keinan-Adamsky, Björn Corzilius, Ron Shahar, Paul Zaslansky, Gil Goobes

Bone is a fascinating biomaterial composed mostly of type-I collagen fibers as an organic phase, apatite as an inorganic phase, and water molecules residing at the interfaces between these phases. They are hierarchically organized with minor constituents such as non-collagenous proteins, citrate ions and glycosaminoglycans into a composite structure that is mechanically durable yet contains enough porosity to accommodate cells and blood vessels. The nanometer scale organization of the collagen fibrous structure and the mineral constituents in bone were recently extensively scrutinized. However, molecular details at the lowest hierarchical level still need to be unraveled to better understand the exact atomic-level arrangement of all these important components in the context of the integral structure of the bone. In this report, we unfold some of the molecular characteristics differentiating between two load …

Show more

May 2022 • Protein Science

Allostery‐driven changes in dynamics regulate the activation of bacterial copper transcription factor

Idan Yakobov, Alysia Mandato, Lukas Hofmann, Kevin Singewald, Yulia Shenberger, Lada Gevorkyan‐Airapetov, Sunil Saxena, Sharon Ruthstein

Metalloregulators bind and respond to metal ions by regulating the transcription of metal homeostasis genes. Copper efflux regulator (CueR) is a copper‐responsive metalloregulator that is found in numerous Gram‐negative bacteria. Upon Cu(I) coordination, CueR initiates transcription by bending the bound DNA promoter regions facilitating interaction with RNA polymerase. The structure of Escherichia coli CueR in presence of DNA and metal ion has been reported using X‐ray crystallography and cryo‐EM, providing information about the mechanism of action. However, the specific role of copper in controlling this transcription mechanism remains elusive. Herein, we use room temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments to follow allosterically driven dynamical changes in E. coli CueR induced by Cu(I) binding. We suggest that more than one Cu(I) ion binds per CueR monomer, leading to …

Show more

May 2022 • Physical Review A

Efimov resonance position near a narrow Feshbach resonance in a mixture

Ang Li, Yaakov Yudkin, Paul S Julienne, Lev Khaykovich

In the vicinity of a narrow Feshbach resonance Efimov features are expected to be characterized by the resonance's properties rather than the van der Waals length of the interatomic potential. Although this theoretical prediction is well established by now, it still lacks experimental confirmation. Here, we apply our recently developed three-channel model [Y. Yudkin and L. Khaykovich, Efimov scenario for overlapping narrow Feshbach resonances, Phys. Rev. A 103, 063303 (2021)] to the experimental result obtained in a mass-imbalanced Li 6− Cs 133 mixture in the vicinity of the narrowest resonance explored to date [J. Johansen, BJ DeSalvo, K. Patel, and C. Chin, Testing universality of Efimov physics across broad and narrow Feshbach resonances, Nat. Phys. 13, 731 (2017)]. Our analysis suggests that the observed position of the Efimov resonance is dictated mainly by the resonance physics while the influence of …

Show more

May 2022 • Pharmaceutics

Photothermal Therapy with HER2-Targeted Silver Nanoparticles Leading to Cancer Remission

Victoria O Shipunova, Mariia M Belova, Polina A Kotelnikova, Olga N Shilova, Aziz B Mirkasymov, Natalia V Danilova, Elena N Komedchikova, Rachela Popovtzer, Sergey M Deyev, Maxim P Nikitin

Nanoparticles exhibiting the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) phenomenon are promising tools for diagnostics and cancer treatment. Among widely used metal nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) possess the strongest light scattering and surface plasmon strength. However, the therapeutic potential of Ag NPs has until now been underestimated. Here we show targeted photothermal therapy of solid tumors with 35 nm HER2-targeted Ag NPs, which were produced by the green synthesis using an aqueous extract of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. Light irradiation tests demonstrated effective hyperthermic properties of these NPs, namely heating by 10 С in 10 min. To mediate targeted cancer therapy, Ag NPs were conjugated to the scaffold polypeptide, affibody Z HER2: 342, which recognizes a clinically relevant oncomarker HER2. The conjugation was mediated by the PEG linker to obtain Ag-PEG-HER2 nanoparticles. Flow cytometry tests showed that Ag-PEG-HER2 particles successfully bind to HER2-overexpressing cells with a specificity comparable to that of full-size anti-HER2 IgGs. A confocal microscopy study showed efficient internalization of Ag-PEG-HER2 into cells in less than 2 h of incubation. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrated effective cell death upon exposure to Ag-PEG-HER2 and irradiation, caused by the production of reactive oxygen species. Xenograft tumor therapy with Ag-PEG-HER2 particles in vivo resulted in full primary tumor regression and the prevention of metastatic spread. Thus, for the first time, we have shown that HER2-directed plasmonic Ag nanoparticles are effective sensitizers for targeted …

Show more

May 2022 • Heart Rhythm

PO-675-08 AG RNA EDITING AS A MEDIATOR OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

Tomer Mann, Eli Eisenberg, Erez Levanon

BackgroundRNA editing is an inflammatory modulator with high activity in the cardiovascular system. It is mainly active in noncoding genomic areas, but also invokes changes in coding genes, mimicking a mutation and altering protein function. Although RNA editing is implicated in atherosclerosis and cardiomyopathy, its role in atriopathy and AF is unknown.Objective

Show more

May 2022 • 2022 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO), 1-2, 2022

Fiber Based Generic Photonic Computing Unit

Maya Yevnin, Eyal Cohen, Tomer Yanir, Zeev Zalevsky

We present a fiber-based photonic computing concept and system which rely on incoherent data encoding and scalable architecture. Our results suggest projected performance of> 1,000,000 Tera operations per second (TOPs) and efficiency of> 1000 TOPs/Watt.

Show more

May 2022 • Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects

Design of silane-based UV-absorbing thin coatings on polyethylene films

Taly Iline-Vul, Naftali Kanovsky, Daniel Yom-Tov, Merav Nadav-Tsubery, Shlomo Margel

UV-absorbing surfaces have received much attention and focus due to their relevance in a variety of research applications and industrial fields. However, these surfaces currently suffer from drawbacks such as instability due to leakage of the entrapped UV-absorbing compounds, complicated non-green synthetic processes, and/or lack of good optical properties. We propose a modified Stöber method where UV absorbing silane monomers containing the group2-hydroxy-4-(3-triethoxysilylpropoxy) diphenylketone (SiUV) in presence of the mesoporous producing surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) was polymerized in an ethanol/water continuous phase under basic conditions. UV absorbing thin coatings onto polyethylene (PE) films were then spread with the former dispersion on corona-treated PE, followed by a thermal drying process. These films were highly UV absorbent and durable with …

Show more

logo
Articali

Powered by Articali

TermsPrivacy